Unit Testing

Forc provides built-in support for building and executing tests for a package.

Tests are written as free functions with the #[test] attribute.

For example:

#[test]
fn test_meaning_of_life() {
    assert(6 * 7 == 42);
}

Each test function is ran as if it were the entry point for a script. Tests "pass" if they return successfully, and "fail" if they revert or vice versa while testing failure.

If the project has failing tests forc test will exit with exit status 101.

Building and Running Tests

We can build and execute all tests within a package with the following:

forc test

The output should look similar to this:

  Compiled library "core".
  Compiled library "std".
  Compiled library "lib_single_test".
  Bytecode size is 92 bytes.
   Running 1 tests
      test test_meaning_of_life ... ok (170.652┬Ás)
   Result: OK. 1 passed. 0 failed. Finished in 1.564996ms.

Visit the forc test command reference to find the options available for forc test.

Testing Failure

Forc supports testing failing cases for test functions declared with #[test(should_revert)].

For example:

#[test(should_revert)]
fn test_meaning_of_life() {
    assert(6 * 6 == 42);
}

It is also possible to specify an expected revert code, like the following example.

#[test(should_revert = "18446744073709486084")]
fn test_meaning_of_life() {
    assert(6 * 6 == 42);
}

Tests with #[test(should_revert)] considered to be passing if they are reverting.

Calling Contracts

Unit tests can call contract functions an example for such calls can be seen below.

contract;

abi MyContract {
    fn test_function() -> bool;
}

impl MyContract for Contract {
    fn test_function() -> bool {
        true
    }
}

To test the test_function(), a unit test like the following can be written.

#[test]
fn test_success() {
    let caller = abi(MyContract, CONTRACT_ID);
    let result = caller.test_function {}();
    assert(result == true)
}

It is also possible to test failure with contract calls as well.

#[test(should_revert)]
fn test_fail() {
    let caller = abi(MyContract, CONTRACT_ID);
    let result = caller.test_function {}();
    assert(result == false)
}

Note: When running forc test, your contract will be built twice: first without unit tests in order to determine the contract's ID, then a second time with unit tests with the CONTRACT_ID provided to their namespace. This CONTRACT_ID can be used with the abi cast to enable contract calls within unit tests.

Unit tests can call methods of external contracts if those contracts are added as contract dependencies, i.e. in the the contract-dependencies section of the manifest file. An example of such calls is shown below:

contract;

abi CallerContract {
    fn test_false() -> bool;
}

impl CallerContract for Contract {
    fn test_false() -> bool {
        false
    }
}

abi CalleeContract {
    fn test_true() -> bool;
}

#[test]
fn test_multi_contract_calls() {
    let caller = abi(CallerContract, CONTRACT_ID);
    let callee = abi(CalleeContract, callee::CONTRACT_ID);

    let should_be_false = caller.test_false();
    let should_be_true = callee.test_true();
    assert(!should_be_false);
    assert(should_be_true);
}

Example Forc.toml for contract above:

[project]
authors = ["Fuel Labs <contact@fuel.sh>"]
entry = "main.sw"
license = "Apache-2.0"
name = "caller"

[dependencies]
std = { path = "../../../sway-lib-std/" }

[contract-dependencies]
callee = { path = "../callee" }

Running Tests in Parallel or Serially

By default, all unit tests in your project are run in parallel. Note that this does not lead to any data races in storage because each unit test has its own storage space that is not shared by any other unit test.

By default, forc test will use all the available threads in your system. To request that a specific number of threads be used, the flag --test-threads <val> can be provided to forc test.

forc test --test-threads 1